Academic Regulations

Absences
Academic Ombudsman
Academic Review Board
Advanced Placement
All-University Degree Requirements
Auditing Courses
Breach of Academic Integrity (Cheating, Plagiarism, Other)
Change of Address
Change of College or Curriculum
Change of Student Status (Full-Time or Part-Time)
Cheating
Class Standing
CLEP
Concentrations
Consumer Information
Course Load
Course Numbering System
Declaration of Minor
Dismissal
Financial Obligation of the Student
Forgiveness Policy, Academic
General Education Course Requirements
Gradepoint Average for Graduation
Gradepoint System
Grades
Graduation
Grievance Policy & Procedure
Honors
Incomplete
Leave of Absence Policy, Undergraduate
Majors and Minors
Plagiarism
Prerequisites
Prerequisite Exam (not for credit)
Probation, Dismissal. and Forgiveness Policies, Undergraduate
Proficiency Exam
Registration
Reinstatement
Repeated Courses
Requirements for the B.A. Degree
Requirements for the B.S. Degree
Requirements for Two Baccalaureate Degrees
Schedule Changes After Registration
Scholastic Probation, Dismissal. and Forgiveness Policies, Undergraduate
Transcript of Credits
Transfer Credit, CLEP, AP Credit
Turning Point Program
Two Degrees, Requirements for

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Academic Regulations

Registration

Registration is an official part of the academic year. By registering, the student subscribes to the terms and conditions, financial and otherwise, which have been set forth by the University. A correct registration is the responsibility of the individual student. Payment of tuition and fees must be made by the deadlines published by the Controller’s Office.

Late registrations may be processed by the student during the first full week of classes. After the first full week of classes, additions may be made only by special permission. The student must obtain the Late Add Request Form and approval signature of the advisor, instructor, and dean of the college of the student’s major field. Late registrations are usually not approved after the second week of classes.

Schedule Changes After Registration

Once a student has registered for even a single class section, changes to that schedule (additions and deletions) may be made by using Webster, the Web registration system, at http://webster.bradley.edu. Instructions are outlined in the Schedule of Classes. Students may cancel their registrations in any classes up to the end of the second full week of classes. These registrations will not be a part of the permanent record. During the third full week through the twelfth full week of classes all courses dropped will be recorded on the permanent record with the indication of “W” (Withdrawn) and the date.

After the twelfth full week of classes, the dean of the college in the student’s major field may, in case of extreme hardship, authorize a student to withdraw from one or more, or all, courses. This action will be recorded on the student’s permanent record with the grade of “W” together with the withdrawal date.

After the first full week of classes, classes may be added only with special permission. The student must obtain a Late Add Request Form and approval signature from the academic advisor, obtain approval from the instructor and chair of the department offering the class, and then obtain an approval signature from the dean of the college in which the course is offered. Classes are not added to a student’s program and no registration is permitted after the second full week of class instruction.

A student who drops a course after the second full week of classes may, with permission of the instructor, continue to attend that class for the remainder of the semester. This privilege will not be permitted in laboratory, military, or studio courses.

Procedures for withdrawing from the University are given in the current Schedule of Classes. ^ top

Students should consult the most current edition of the Schedule of Classes for details concerning procedures, dates, and refund policies.

Undergraduate Leave of Absence Policy

The leave of absence opportunity is available for undergraduate students who must leave Bradley University for a period of time not to exceed 12 consecutive months. A leave of absence may be granted for various reasons, such as personal, medical, or financial. The leave of absence must be approved in advance of the semester in which the leave of absence is to begin and can not be granted to a student who is on probation or dismissed from the University. For the complete policy, consult the Registrar’s Office or the dean of your college.

Credit Taken in Residence at Bradley

Student Course Load

Twelve semester hours is the minimum load for a full-time student. The regular load is prescribed by the college in which the student is enrolled. A student must petition to enroll in excess hours (more than 181/2 hours in a regular semester). The authority to approve petitions for excess hours shall be vested in the dean of the college in which the student is registered.

One credit hour is usually assigned to a class that meets 50 minutes a week over a period of a semester. In laboratory, fieldwork, or similar type of instruction, one credit hour is assigned for a session that meets two or three hours a week for a semester.

An Undergraduate Student-at-Large (non-degree-seeking) may not take 12 or more semester hours during either fall or spring semesters except with the approval of the Director of Continuing Education. A maximum of 45 semester hours taken as an Undergraduate Student-at-Large can be accepted toward a degree program. Students who are uncertain about their interest in pursuing a degree are strongly encouraged to apply for admission to a degree program rather than enroll as an Undergraduate Student-at-Large.

All courses taken for credit for which a student is registered at Bradley or elsewhere are counted as part of the total semester hour load the student is permitted to carry.

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Student Class Standing
Change of Student Status (Full-Time or Part-Time)

Ordinarily, the classification of full-time students will not be changed after the second week of classes even though the course load drops below 12 semester hours. In cases where this rule creates undue hardship, the dean of the college involved, upon the student’s request, may suspend this rule.   ^ top

Prerequisites

Students should understand that listed prerequisites may be met through equivalent courses. Please consult your academic advisor if you have a question about prerequisites.

Students who enroll in courses for which they do not meet the prescribed prerequisites may be required to withdraw from the courses.   ^ top

Course Numbering System

The following course numbering system is used as a guide for students in selecting courses: Courses numbered 100-199 are planned primarily for freshmen. Courses numbered 200-299 are intended primarily for sophomores. Courses numbered 300-499 are designed primarily for juniors and seniors. Courses numbered 500-599 are open only to seniors, graduate students and specially qualified juniors. Courses numbered 600-699 are reserved for graduate students only.

Please consult the all-University, college and departmental requirements for the number of semester hours needed at specific course levels.

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Repeated Courses

The policy regarding repeated courses is that a student at Bradley may not receive credit for the same course twice unless the course is approved by the University Senate as repeatable. The last grade and credits earned for each course shall be the only ones used in computing the gradepoint calculations and in satisfying graduation requirements. However, the entry on the permanent record for both enrollments remain. (Proficiency exams cannot be used for repeating courses because credit earned in this manner is not used in gradepoint calculations.)

If a student registers again for a course which is already a part of the scholastic record and the number of the course has changed since the original enrollment, permission to substitute a course must be obtained from the dean of the college which offered the course being repeated.

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Auditing Courses

All Bradley students (undergraduate, graduate, full-time and part-time) in good academic standing registered for a given academic term, along with individuals admitted “at large,” for a given academic term may request permission to enroll as an “auditor.” Permission to audit a course must be approved by both the instructor and the chairperson of the department offering the course. Enrollment is contingent on having available space in the class. Except in special circumstances to be determined by the instructor and department chairperson, courses involving laboratory or studio work cannot be audited. Only regular students and auditors listed on the official class roster are allowed to attend class.

Forms for audit registration are available in the Registrar’s Office or online. Audit registrations are accepted by the Registrar’s Office only after the first day of classes of each academic term.

The extent to which an auditor participates in a course and the requirements for satisfactory performance must be specified by the instructor when approval is granted. Instructors are not obligated to grade any course work performed by the auditor. Courses taken for audit do not earn academic credit, do not apply toward any academic degree and do not count toward a student’s full-time or part-time load for purposes of financial aid, loan deferments or visa status. Courses taken for audit are recorded on the student’s permanent academic record as completed satisfactorily (“X”), completed unsatisfactorily (“UX”), or withdrawn (“W”).

After the last day for adding classes with special permission, anyone who is registered as an auditor may not change the audit registration to a “for credit” status, i.e. a regular registration; likewise, a student registered for credit may not change to audit status. Deadlines associated with courses taken for credit and courses taken for audit are identical.

All individuals will be charged a non-refundable fee for audited courses. The current fee is published in the Schedule of Classes. Persons who have audited a course may petition to earn credit by proficiency examination; however, the charge for a proficiency examination for credit is based on the standard tuition structure determined by the Controller’s Office with a credit granted for charges associated with auditing.

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Non-Resident Credit

Transfer Credit From Collegiate Institutions

Credits from collegiate institutions which are accredited by one of the regional accrediting associations such as the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools will be considered for acceptance at Bradley University.1 Official transcripts of credit must be requested by the student and received by Bradley directly from the institution at which the credit was earned. Application of transfer credits to satisfy general education requirements shall be determined by the Associate Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Acceptance will be based on comparability of the transfer work with the nature, content and level of work offered at Bradley. Bradley University will not accept for credit the transfer of physical activity courses. Application of transfer credits to satisfy specific college graduation requirements shall be determined by the dean of the college in which the student is majoring. In the event that a student changes majors while at Bradley, a new evaluation of credit will be made. Courses with grades of “D” from a particular institution will be considered for transfer only if the student’s cumulative grade average at that institution is at least 2.0 out of 4.0 at the time of transfer. The grade average for subsequent evaluations will be calculated only on the work not yet recorded on the Bradley permanent scholastic record. Once work with D grades has been evaluated and denied, it will not be evaluated again with work taken at a later time. (In some majors, D credit for transfer work does not count to fulfill specific requirements in that major.) Grades earned in transferable credits are posted on the student’s permanent record solely for the purpose of advisement and evaluation by the department chair and dean of the college in which the student is enrolled. A maximum of 66 semester hours of credit will be accepted from two-year colleges. If other institutions are using a quarter hour system, those hours will be converted to semester hours. Only work taken at the junior-senior level at the source institution will be counted toward meeting the requirement for junior-senior level work at Bradley.

Transfer Credit for Students New to Bradley

For students who have not enrolled at Bradley previously, official transcripts of credit from other institutions must be mailed directly from the institution at which the credit was earned to the Admissions Office at Bradley University for evaluation.

Work Taken at Other Collegiate Institutions by Regular Bradley Students

All conditions of acceptance of transfer credit apply to work taken at other collegiate institutions by continuing Bradley students. Students should obtain written approval from the dean of the college in which they are majoring before registering at the other institution. If the credit is to fulfill General Education requirements at Bradley, the written approval must come from the Associate Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Unless such written approval is given, students electing to take courses at another institution have no guarantee that the credit will be accepted at Bradley. Continuing Bradley students should request the other institution to send an official transcript of credit directly to the Registrar’s Office at Bradley. If the other institution is using a quarter hour system, those hours will be converted to semester hours.

Seniors who take work at another institution to complete degree requirements at Bradley must file proof of registration for that work in the form of a letter from the Registrar of that institution. This letter must be received in the Bradley Registrar’s Office at least one month prior to Commencement if the student plans to participate in Commencement exercises. The work must be completed by the time of Bradley’s Commencement. The diploma will be awarded after receipt by the Bradley Registrar’s Office of an official transcript of credits from the other institution.

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Level of Transfer Credit

Transfer credit shall be accepted on the same level on which the work was offered at the source institution. For example, courses taught at the source institution on the freshman level will be accepted for credit on the freshman level at Bradley. No junior-senior credit will be given for work taken at a two-year college.

Credit by Correspondence and Extension

Students wishing to take correspondence or extension courses for transfer purposes must have the prior written approval of their dean. A total of thirty semester hours through extension and correspondence, with a maximum nine semester hours of correspondence, will be permitted to count toward graduation, except in the College of Engineering and Technology. In the College of Engineering and Technology, a maximum of ten semester hours of credit taken by correspondence and extension may be counted toward graduation.   ^ top

Examination for Advanced Placement

Credit may be given in courses covered by Advanced Placement Examinations offered by the College Board if the score received is three or higher. The number of semester hours of credit allowed is determined by the extent of the college work covered by this examination, as recommended by the department offering the work at Bradley. Inquiries should be directed to the Admissions Office.   

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College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)

Bradley University accepts up to 60 semester hours of credit for those who earn scores on CLEP general and subject exams in the 50th percentile or higher. Some of these hours may be used to satisfy general education requirements.

CLEP credit is transfer credit. Students wishing to transfer CLEP hours to Bradley may do so by directing the CLEP office to forward official score results to Undergraduate Admissions at Bradley University. Because CLEP credit is transfer credit, it cannot duplicate credit already earned from another source.

CLEP credit may be applied in the following ways to satisfy general education requirements.

Not all CLEP exams are approved for credit at Bradley. If you have questions about how CLEP credit applies to Bradley, please consult the following:

For more information about testing sites or other details, contact CLEP at (609) 771-7865 or www.collegeboard.com/clep.

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Credit by Proficiency Examination

Credit by proficiency examination is classified as non-residence credit. Upon presentation of acceptable evidence of competence, students enrolled in the University may apply for permission to attempt to earn credit by examination in certain undergraduate subjects. Applications for such examinations will be submitted to the chairperson of the department that offers the course, who will, if the application is approved, arrange for the administration of the examination.

Students receiving approval to attempt to earn credit by examination will pay a non-refundable fee of $50.00 for the examination for each course number listed in the catalog. This fee must be paid before the examination is taken.

Students who have had no previous college experience, and who have been admitted as full-time students, may apply for permission to attempt credit by examination in certain undergraduate subjects. Such examination will be taken prior to the student’s second registration. Credit, but no grade, will be recorded for examinations passed.

Grades for examinations taken after the student’s second registration will be entered on the permanent record. Students shall have the option of requesting either a letter grade or a grade of Pass/Fail. A grade of “C” or better will be considered a passing grade for both options. A grade of “D” is not acceptable for a proficiency examination. The option selected must be agreed upon by the student and the department offering the course at the time of application for the examination. Because credit by proficiency is not considered residence credit, grades are not computed in the student’s cumulative gradepoint average. Seniors may not take examinations for credit toward any degree in courses which are numbered below 300. Application blanks are available in the dean’s or Registrar’s Office.

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Departmental Prerequisite Examinations (Not for Credit)

At the discretion of the department offering the course, regularly enrolled students of the University may be allowed to take a special examination in any course offered by the department in order to satisfy prerequisites for subsequent courses. Before a student will be permitted to take a prerequisite examination, a $50.00 fee for each course number listed in the catalog must be paid to the Controller’s Office.

A prerequisite examination carries no University credit and no grade. Upon successful completion of a prerequisite examination an appropriate entry will be made on the permanent record of the student.

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All-University Degree Requirements
Responsibility for Meeting Degree Requirements

A minimum of 124 semester hours is required for all baccalaureate degrees. The curricula of certain departments require as many as 150-155 semester hours.

Students who maintain continuous enrollment and who complete work toward the baccalaureate degree within five years from the date of entry may graduate under either the catalog in effect at the time of entrance or under the catalog in effect at the time of graduation. A change in major could mean meeting new requirements in force at the time of the change as a condition for acceptance into that major. Students whose work has been interrupted for one or more semesters may be held to requirements in effect at the time of their re-enrollment.   ^ top

Residence Requirements

Only work registered through Bradley University during the two regular semesters or the interim and summer sessions is considered as residence work. No proficiency examinations, correspondence, extension courses, or credit earned through the College-Level Examination Program may be counted as residence work.

All candidates for the bachelor’s degree must meet the following residence requirements:

  1. A minimum of 30 semester hours earned in residence is required of all students.
  2. 24 of the last 30 semester hours must be earned in residence.
Junior-Senior Credits

Candidates for a bachelor’s degree must present a minimum of 40 semester hours in junior and senior courses (those numbered 300 and above). Check your college requirements for proper distribution of these courses.

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General Education Requirements

Candidates for all baccalaureate degrees must complete requirements in general education. Students should consult the most current Schedule of Classes for the list of courses which are approved by the University Senate to fill these requirements.

The general education requirements are based upon the principle of “liberal education.” The fundamental assumptions about liberal education include:

The requirements for degrees from all colleges are:

English Composition (C1 and C2)
6 semester hours including English 101 (C1) and a 3-hour, 300-level advanced writing course (C2)

Western Civilization I and II

(Completion of both CIV 111 and CIV 112 will satisfy C1 and WC general education requirements. No general education credit will be given if only one course is completed.)

C2 choose from

Speech (SP)

3 semester hours

Mathematics (MA)

3 semester hours chosen from

Western Civilization (WC)

3 semester hours

(Completion of both CIV 111 and CIV 112 will satisfy C1 and WC general education requirements. No general education credit will be given if only one course is completed.)

Non-Western Civilization (NW)

(Education majors: Some courses are not acceptable by ISBE for teaching certification. See your advisor.)

3 semester hours chosen from

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Fine Arts (FA)

(Education majors: Some courses are not acceptable by ISBE for teaching certification. See your advisor.)

3 semester hours chosen from

Human Values (HL or HP)

(Majors in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences must take 6 semester hours: 3 hours HL and 3 hours HP.)

3 semester hours chosen from

Human Values Literary (HL)
Human Values Philosophical (HP)
Cultural Diversity and Social Forces (CD & SF)

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6 semester hours, including at least one SF course, chosen from

Cultural Diversity (CD)
Social Forces (SF)
Science and Technology (FS and TS)

6 semester hours, including at least 3 semester hours of FS, chosen from Fundamental Concepts in Science (FS)

Fundamental Concepts in Science (FS)

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Science and Technology in the Contemporary World (TS)

Transfer students who have earned only 5 semester hours of English Composition, Social Forces, or Science and Technology and 2 semester hours of Basic Speech, Western Civilization, Non-Western Civilization, Human Values, or Fine Arts are considered to have satisfied the all-University course requirements in these subjects.

All freshmen will register for ENG 101 and COM 103 during the freshman year. Note that ENG 101 and COM 103 should not be taken the same semester. All students must register for an advanced writing course (ENG 300, 301, 304, 305, or 306) during their junior year.

Bradley University participates in the Illinois Articulation Initiative (IAI).

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Gradepoint Average for Graduation

A minimum cumulative gradepoint average of 2.00 based upon hours taken at Bradley is required for graduation.

Requirements for the B.A. Degree

All candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree must present credit for two years of college-level foreign language or its equivalent. This requirement may be met by the completion of a 202 or 300-level course or by transfer of similar credits from another institution or by a proficiency examination. Students with four units of high school language must successfully complete a 202 or 300-level course or satisfy this requirement by a proficiency examination in order to receive the Bachelor of Arts degree.

Students who have taken a foreign language in high school and wish to continue studies in the same language will be required to take a placement examination to assure placement at the proper college level.

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Requirements for the B.S. Degree

In order to receive the Bachelor of Science degree, students must successfully complete at least 6 hours of courses selected from physical and natural science, mathematics, computer science, statistics, or quantitative methods in addition to the hours used to fulfill the University general education requirements. The following courses may be used to fulfill the additional 6-hour requirement for the B.S. degree—all courses in astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer science, geological sciences, physics, mathematics (except MTH 100 and MTH 109), technical mathematics, and, in addition, these courses: BMA 372, ECO 319, FCS 303, PSY 415, PSY 536, QM 262, QM 263, and SCI 101.

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Majors, Concentrations, and Minors

Major

A major is a coherent, structured course of study, defined by departments and selected by students as their principal subject area.

Generally, the major is comprised of courses offered and required by the department, but it may also include designated courses from other departments offering related subjects. All students must fulfill the requirements for at least one major in order to graduate.

In addition to courses used to satisfy the general education requirements, students must successfully complete a minimum of 24 semester hours of courses designated by the department as acceptable toward the major.

The major must include no fewer than 12 semester hours at the 300 (junior) level or above.

Students must achieve a minimum grade point average in courses in the major of no less than 2.0 in order to graduate.

Multiple majors must include at least 18 semester hours of courses not used in satisfaction of requirements for any other major.  ^ top

Concentration

The concentration must be a coherent, structured course of study. It is comprised of no fewer than 12 semester hours of the minimum 24 semester hours required for the major. No fewer than 6 semester hours must be in courses at the 300 level or above. To qualify for more than one concentration within one major, no fewer than nine semester hours must be in different courses in each concentration.

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Minor

The minor must be coherent, structured course of study. A minor is comprised of no fewer than 15 semester hours, a majority of which are at the 200 (sophomore) level or above with no fewer than 6 semester hours at the 300 (junior) level or above.

Students must achieve a minimum grade point average of 2.0 in courses in the minor for official designation as a minor.

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Declaration of Minor

Students declaring a minor must report to the advisor in their major field to notify that advisor of their intent to seek a minor. After obtaining the signature of the advisor in their major field, the form is presented to the advisor for the intended minor for that advisor’s approval. The student then presents the form to the dean of the college of the intended minor who forwards this form to the Registrar for official entry to the student’s permanent scholastic record.

Requirements

Requirements for majors and for minors are specified in the catalog under each curriculum offering them. Students may graduate with a single major or a number of majors and minors when the requirements of each, including all college and department requirements, are met at the time of graduation.

Students may, with the approval of the dean of the college offering the work, complete additional majors or minors after graduation and have the completion and date noted on the permanent scholastic record.

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Requirements for Two Baccalaureate Degrees

Students seeking two baccalaureate degrees from Bradley University may qualify for both degrees by meeting the specific requirements for each and presenting residence hours totaling thirty beyond the degree demanding the larger number of semester hours. The degrees may be earned consecutively or concurrently.

Grades

Grades in individual courses should reflect achievement in the subject matter in accordance with the standards of the course. Instructors shall inform students of standards for the course, the basis for judgment in grading, and the weight of each criterion in the assessment of the final grade. The standards of grading shall remain constant throughout the semester.

Students have the right to know where they stand in each course at periodic intervals throughout the semester. Any work submitted for evaluation should be assessed and returned promptly.

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Incomplete

“IN” is the symbol used when the instructor lacks sufficient evidence to award a letter grade. The purpose of an “IN” is to provide the time necessary for a student to complete course work which, through no fault of the student’s, was not completed in the normal time allowed. Reasonable time necessary for completion is decided by the student and the faculty member teaching the course. The “IN”, once assigned, remains on the official academic record upon conversion to a grade or permanent “I”.

The “IN” should not be mistakenly considered as an incentive for the faculty to recommend or for students to believe that this extension permits students merely to retake courses, or to extend the time for the completion of the prescribed work beyond the end of the semester of enrollment, as the means of removing the “Incomplete.”

For undergraduates, at the time the “IN” is assigned, the instructor must file with his or her director or department chair a copy of the contract specifying what must be done to complete the “IN” and the date by which the “IN” must be converted. For undergraduates, an “IN” must be converted not later than four weeks before the end of the next regular semester in which the student is enrolled or the Registrar will record a permanent “I”. If the instructor does not submit a letter grade by the specified deadline, the “I” will remain permanently upon the student’s record and may not thereafter be removed. Under unusual circumstances, the student may be granted an extension to the end of the semester with the approval of the instructor involved, provided that the request was received prior to the normal deadline for the removal of Incompletes.

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Gradepoint System

The grading system of the University for undergraduate students is based on the following:

       Marks    Honor points    per semester hour

Gradepoint average is determined by dividing honor points by semester hours.

Only work registered through Bradley University is used in calculation of gradepoint averages. Courses which are taken for audit are assigned no grade nor honor points and are not entered on the student’s permanent record. P, IN, IP, and W’s are not considered in calculating the gradepoint average. For repeated courses, the last grade and credits earned shall be the only ones used in the calculation of gradepoint averages. Credit earned by proficiency examination is not used in the calculation of gradepoint averages.  ^ top

Mid-Term Grades

A report of mid-term grades is prepared for all undergraduate students shortly after the midpoint of the fall and spring semesters. All students have electronic access to their mid-term grades.

Mid-term grades are provided only to give students an indication of their progress and are not officially recorded on permanent records.

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Final Grades

Final grades will be issued for each class in which a student is officially registered. A report of these final grades will be posted on Webster, the online information system, by the Office of the Registrar within a very short time following the close of the semester. All challenges to final grades must be made in the next regular semester after the grade was awarded. All completed grade change request forms must be submitted to the dean of the college in which the course is offered no later than four weeks before the end of the next regular semester.

Academic Ombudsman

The Academic Ombudsman, a faculty member to whom students may bring complaints about teaching, operates under the following conditions. The Ombudsman will have a purely communicative function. If, after discussing the complaint with the Ombudsman, the student desires, the Ombudsman shall communicate the nature of the complaint to the instructor involved. Then, if the student thinks an insufficient corrective effort has been made, the student may discuss the matter with the Ombudsman and request that the complaint be forwarded to the instructor’s department chair. The Ombudsman shall regard all information received by virtue of the position as absolutely confidential, except as provided in this statement. Students who do not choose to use the services of the Ombudsman can use the process of administrative appeal, starting first with the instructor, then the instructor’s department chair, the dean, and finally the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Complaints should be resolved at the lowest level.

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Undergraduate Scholastic Probation, Dismissal and Forgiveness Policies

Scholastic Probation

A minimum cumulative gradepoint average of 2.00 based on grades at Bradley University is required for graduation. Students must maintain this minimum gradepoint average each semester in order to remain in good standing.

A student whose cumulative gradepoint average is less than 2.00 will be enrolled on probation for the next semester. Students on probation will be unable to register for January Interim or May Interim during early registration. A student enrolled on probation who does not achieve either a cumulative gradepoint average of 2.00 or a semester gradepoint average of 2.25 at the end of the semester will be dismissed. A student who enrolls on probation is urged to see his or her academic advisor who will review the academic program of the student and recommend a course of study. Participation in the Turning Point Program is recommended, and in most cases required, for students on probation. (See below.)

A student’s probationary status will be changed to “good standing” as soon as the student’s cumulative gradepoint reaches 2.00 or higher.

Summer school and interim terms will not be counted as probationary, but grades earned will be computed in the student’s cumulative gradepoint average.

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Turning Point Program

The Turning Point Program, an academic support service offered through the Center for Learning Assistance, is required for all undergraduate students on academic probation for the first time and reinstated students as recommended by the Academic Review Board. When final semester grades are processed, students are notified in writing about being automatically enrolled in the Turning Point Program.

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Scholastic Dismissal

A student enrolled on probation who does not achieve either a cumulative gradepoint average of 2.00 or a semester gradepoint average of 2.25 at the end of the semester will be dismissed.

Once dismissed, the student will not be allowed to attend any class offered by Bradley University for college credit, including any interim, summer session, or continuing education class, without reinstatement. There are no reinstatements for the interim session immediately following dismissal. Apply for reinstatement with the Academic Review Board. In special cases, the academic dean may approve reinstatement for summer sessions immediately following dismissal. A student’s enrollment will be canceled as a result of academic dismissal if there is no reinstatement by the Academic Review Board.

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Petitions for Scholastic Reinstatement

Any student dismissed for poor scholarship has the right of appeal for reinstatement. A student should not expect to be reinstated until after one full regular semester has intervened. Petitions for reinstatement should be directed to the Academic Review Board.

Academic Forgiveness Policy

To qualify for the Academic Forgiveness Policy, students must not have been enrolled in a Bradley degree program for at least five years.

Persons who wish to be readmitted to Bradley University under the Academic Forgiveness Policy must petition the Academic Review Board and request forgiveness of previous grades earned at Bradley. If the petition is approved, grades for all Bradley courses taken before the hiatus of five or more years will be removed from the GPA calculation. Students will retain credit for those courses with grades of “C” or better, whether the credit was taken in residence at Bradley or from another source.

The forgiven grades shall not count in determining the student’s grade point average for academic probation or dismissal or for graduation; however, they shall remain on the transcript with an appropriate notation, and shall be used in determining graduation honors.

Forgiveness is a one-time option which is final and irreversible once granted.

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Academic Review Board

The Academic Review Board is authorized to act upon petitions of reinstatement of undergraduate students dismissed for poor scholarship. This board also considers petitions for Academic Forgiveness and waivers of graduation regulations.

Dismissal for Other Causes

Students found guilty of a breach of academic integrity (plagiarism, cheating, unauthorized use of University computers, etc.) are subject to disciplinary action, including dismissal from the University.

It is the responsibility of the faculty member to report to the Executive Director of the Center for Residential Living and Leadership any occurrences of breaches of academic integrity and the penalties assigned to the student. Specific procedures for doing so and the appropriate penalties are published in the Faculty and Student Handbooks.

In addition to breaches of academic integrity, students whose actions are considered detrimental to the best interest of the University may be dismissed from the University upon recommendation of the administration, the faculty, or the appropriate University committee. Such actions are specifically described in the University’s Student Handbook.

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Breach of Academic Integrity

According to Senate rules, all occasions of academic dishonesty must be reported to the Executive Director of Residential Life and Leadership, together with a statement of the penalty imposed by the faculty member. If, in the opinion of the Executive Director of Residential Life and Leadership, other problems of a personal or an emotional nature are present, a referral to the Center for Student Health Services will be made.

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Cheating

Cheating is officially defined as giving or attempting to give, or obtaining or attempting to obtain, information relative to an examination or other work that the student is expected to do alone and not in collaboration with others, or the use of material or information restricted by the instructor. Each instructor will indicate beforehand work that may be done in collaboration with other students.

Examples of cheating include but are not limited to copying from another person during an examination, using materials not allowed by the instructor during an examination, collaboration on a take-home examination or other assignments where it has been expressly prohibited by the instructor, and the submission of a laboratory report based on data not obtained by the student in the manner indicated by the instructor. The person who provides illicit information is liable to the same punishment as the person who receives and uses it.

A “Zero,” or whatever is the equivalent of the lowest failing grade possible, shall be assigned for that piece of work to any student cheating on a non-final examination or other class assignment.

A “Zero,” or whatever is the equivalent of the lowest failing grade possible, shall be assigned on a final examination to any student cheating on a final examination. An “F” shall also be assigned as the course grade to any student cheating on a comprehensive final examination.

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Plagiarism

Plagiarism is no lesser an offense than cheating. Examples of plagiarism as stated in The Modern Language Association’s MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers include but are not limited to repeating another’s sentences as your own, adopting a particularly apt phrase as your own, paraphrasing someone else’s argument as your own, and presenting someone else’s line of thinking in the development of a thesis as though it were your own.

A “Zero,” or whatever is the equivalent of the lowest failing grade possible, shall be assigned for that piece of work to any student plagiarizing on a non-final piece of work. In the case of a student plagiarizing on a final research paper or project, an “F” shall also be assigned as the course grade.  ^ top

Repeated Offenses of Plagiarism and Cheating

For repeated or aggravated offenses of cheating and or plagiarism, additional action, including dismissal from the University, may be taken pursuant to the Student Handbook procedures related to the University Judicial System and the disciplinary sanctions for violation of University regulations.

Other Breaches of Academic Integrity

Other examples of what might constitute a breach of academic integrity include, but are not limited to, the following: bribes, favors or threats with the intent of influencing a grade or any other evaluation of academic performance; taking an examination for another student; and grade tampering.  ^ top

Grievance Procedure

If the student objects to the instructor’s conclusion that a breach of academic integrity has occurred, the student may consult the University Ombudsman and/or appeal the instructor’s conclusion through the instructor’s department chair to the Dean or to the Dean’s designee(s) of the college in which the course is offered, within 20 days of the time that the student receives written notification of the instructor’s conclusion. A copy of the notification will be filed with the Director of Residential Life and Student Judicial System. Due process requirements for a fair hearing shall be provided to all parties. The record of the hearing before the Dean or the Dean’s designee(s) shall consist of written statements of the instructor and student in support of their positions provided prior to the hearing and a tape recording or transcript of the hearing itself. An appeal of the decision of the Dean’s or the Dean’s designee(s) may be made within 10 days of the decision by written appeal to the University Student Grievance Committee. In the event of an appeal, the Dean shall transmit the decision to the University Student Grievance Committee, and if the Dean’s designee(s) rendered the decision, the Dean shall indicate whether or not he or she agrees with the decision.

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Graduation

Responsibility for Graduation Requirements

Every candidate for a degree is personally responsible for meeting all requirements for graduation. No University official can relieve the student of this responsibility.

Application for Graduation

Seniors who plan to receive a baccalaureate degree in December should make application for graduation at registration time for the fall semester, or no later than the end of the first full week of classes in the fall semester. Candidates for the baccalaureate degree in May should make application at registration time for the spring semester, or no later than the end of the first full week of classes in the spring semester. Students can apply for graduation online via Webster (webster.bradley.edu). In addition, application forms are available in the Registrar’s Office and online at bradley.edu/registrar/graduation. Completed undergraduate applications must be filed in the Registrar’s Office.

If a student fails to complete the requirements at the time stated on the application for graduation, reapplication must be made for a later date.  ^ top

Completion of Degree Requirements

Students who maintain continuous enrollment and who complete work toward the baccalaureate degree within five years from the date of entry may graduate under either the catalog in effect at the time of entrance or under the catalog in effect at the time of graduation. A change in major could mean meeting new requirements in force at the time of the change as a condition for acceptance into that major. Students whose work has been interrupted for one or more semesters may be held to requirements in effect at the time of their re-enrollment.

Candidates for a degree must meet all-University requirements and requirements in the curriculum for which they have applied. The deans of the colleges give final approval for graduation and recommend the candidates for the degree. Therefore, questions concerning degree requirements should be directed to the college deans.

Students electing to take courses at another accredited institution to meet Bradley graduation requirements must obtain prior written approval of their dean. An official transcript covering this coursework must be received by the Bradley University Registrar’s Office no later than two weeks after the end of the Bradley semester.

The grades of all work needed to fulfill the graduation requirements, whether earned through residence at Bradley or on another campus, must be completed and received by the Registrar’s Office no later than two weeks after the end of the Bradley semester.

Note the University regulations concerning incompletes and their removal deadline earlier in this catalog. Incomplete grades must be resolved prior to the degree being awarded.

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Attendance at Commencement

Commencement is held following the end of each regular semester. All candidates for the degree whose names appear on the tentative list of candidates posted one month prior to the commencement may attend the commencement ceremony.

Students may participate in Commencement if they have proof of registration for the work which will complete the requirements for the degree. If some coursework is being transferred, proof of registration from the Registrar of the other institution must be received by the end of the third full week of classes.

Students who have degree requirements remaining may apply for permission to participate in a particular commencement if the following conditions are met: the remaining degree requirements do not exceed two courses and/or required practical experiences; and it must be possible for the student to complete the remaining degree requirements during the interim and/or summer session immediately following the commencement. Formal requests for permission must be filed with your college dean. The actual date of the degree would be the next official graduation date immediately following the completion of degree requirements.

Awarding of Diplomas

Diplomas will be awarded at the end of the Fall, Spring, and Summer terms, whichever date follows the completion of all of the requirements for the degree, and will bear that date. Diplomas will be awarded only to students completing all degree requirements.

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Honors

Cum Laude, Magna Cum Laude, Summa Cum Laude

By commencement honors, Bradley University recognizes a student’s superior scholastic achievement. Evidence of achievement is shown by the student’s gradepoint average (GPA).

To be awarded special honors at Commencement, a student must have earned or be registered for a minimum of 60 semester hours in residence at Bradley University.

A student will be awarded Commencement Honors according to the following standard:

For recognition at Honors Day and at Commencement, the computation of the Honors designation earned by GPA shall be made on the basis of cumulative GPA and hours completed at the end of the semester immediately preceding graduation (normally after seven semesters of work). The computation of the GPA for Honors designation on the student’s permanent record and diploma shall be made on the basis of all work completed at Bradley University at the time of graduation.

Students who have successfully completed the requirements of the University Honors Program will be recognized for this achievement by a separate certificate.

Dean’s List

Those full-time students who earn a semester GPA of 3.5 or higher on a 4.0 grading scale are given the distinction of being placed on the University’s Dean’s list for their outstanding scholastic achievement.

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University Student Grievance Policy

A student academic grievance is appropriate in cases in which the student claims unfair, prejudicial, or capricious evaluation or treatment of an academic nature. A grievance is not appropriate on actions which would impair the exercise of academic freedom. A student non-academic grievance is appropriate in cases involving access to and participation in course offerings, sexual harassment, racial discrimination, or any other act by a University faculty member that is derogatory or discriminatory in nature. No student may pursue the formal part of the following grievance procedure before exhausting all informal procedures. What follows does not preclude a faculty member’s appeal to the Faculty Grievance Committee.

The grievance process is intended to deal with matters as expeditiously as possible. Although the times listed below are recommended guidelines for handling the steps of the process, it is expected that they will not be exceeded except under compelling circumstances.

A student who claims grievance as described may consult with the Ombudsman or meet directly with the instructor involved. The grievance process is as follows:

  1. Informal Procedure

    1. The student shall meet with the instructor in an attempt to resolve the issue within 15 days on a non-academic grievance and normally within 15 days of the beginning of the next semester on an academic grievance. (The student may consult with the Ombudsman.)

    2. Should the issue not be resolved to mutual satisfaction, the student may, within five days, appeal an academic matter to the Chair of the given Department who shall provide the student and faculty member with a decision within five days of appeal, or appeal a non-academic matter to the office of the Associate Provost for Student Affairs, who will attempt to resolve the matter within 10 working days from the time of appeal. In cases involving a conflict of interest with the Associate Provost for Student Affairs, the student may appeal a non-academic matter to the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. If any unfair or unjustifiable injury or disadvantage occurred, the decision shall include specific remedies to rectify the situation.

    3. Should an academic issue not be resolved to the satisfaction of the parties, the student or faculty member may, within five days, appeal the decision of the Chair to the Dean(s) of the College(s) in which the given academic concern resides and to the Dean of the Graduate School if a graduate student is involved. This appeal shall specify in writing the alleged grievance. The Dean(s) or Dean(s)’ designee(s) should meet with the relevant parties within five days of the appeal. The Dean shall deliver a decision within five days after said meeting. If any unfair or unjustifiable injury or disadvantage occurred, the Dean’s decision shall include specific remedies to rectify it.

  2. Formal Procedure

Should the issue not be resolved to the satisfaction of the parties, the student or faculty member may, within five days of the final written decision above, initiate the formal phase of the grievance procedure by written appeal to the Chairperson of the University Student Grievance Committee. Legal counsel may be used by the parties at the parties’ cost, as part of the formal procedure. Legal counsel for either party shall act in an advisory capacity only and not be permitted to speak on behalf of any party. The Committee shall have access to the University attorney on procedural matters.

    1. The Student Grievance Committee shall accept for hearing only those cases considered grievances as described above.

    2. The Student Grievance Committee shall meet at the call of the Chairperson upon receipt of a formal grievance. The Chairperson will:

      1. Obtain written statements from all parties involved in the appeal.

      2. Call for a meeting of the Committee to review the statements from the parties involved within 10 days of submission of the appeal, unless extraordinary circumstances require a delay, and determine a date and time for the hearing.

The Committee will:
  1. Notify all parties of the time, date, and place of the hearing at least five days in advance.
  2. Call on other faculty, staff, and students if it would serve the purposes of due process.
  3. Retain records of all written matters dealing with each case.
  4. If the committee decides that a grievance is not in order and the alleged grievance concerned discrimination, a copy of the minutes of the meeting will be sent to the Affirmative Action Officer.
  1. The Committee shall submit its findings and decision to the appropriate academic officer for review within 45 days after the matter has been formally submitted to the Committee. This time period shall not include University holidays and times when the faculty are not under contract such as during the summer. If the Committee finds that unfair or unjustifiable injury or disadvantage has occurred, it shall forward to the appropriate academic officer its specific suggestions for rectifying it. The appropriate academic officer, within 30 days of the receipt of the findings and recommendations of the Committee, shall notify all concerned parties of agreement or disagreement with the Committee’s decision, stating the reasons in writing. Upon agreement of the parties, the grievance process can be concluded at any time before notification by the appropriate academic officer.
  2. In cases where there are findings of unfair or unjustifiable treatment of students in a non-academic matter, the Associate Provost for Student Affairs is responsible for rectifying the situation per the Committee’s findings.

Miscellaneous University Regulations

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Absences

This is the all-University policy regarding absences. Consult the policy of your own college or department for further details.

Every student is expected to attend all classes regularly. Each student is responsible for all work contained in the course, even in case of absences caused by circumstances beyond the control of the student. In case of absence, provision for make-up work, insofar as make-up work is possible, may be made by the instructor if acceptable reason for the absence is presented.

The grade in any given course will therefore ordinarily depend upon the amount and quality of the work done in the course. Absence will affect the grade insofar as the quality of work is affected. Reasons for absences are presented to the instructor by the student.

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Change of College or Curriculum

Changes of a student’s major must be initiated with the academic advisor in the student’s current major field. A list of these advisors is found in the front of the Schedule of Classes.

After the form has been completed by the academic advisor, the student should take the form to the dean of the college in which the student was registered for the dean’s signature. The student obtains the signature of the advisor in the new major field, and then takes the form to the dean of the college to which the student is transferring and leaves the form with the new dean. If the change does not involve a change of college (merely a change of curriculum within the same college) the dean of that college will retain and process the form.

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Change of Address

Students should report promptly to the Registrar’s Office in Swords Hall any change of address whether this change involves the student’s campus address, permanent mailing address, or parents’ address.

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All addresses for students not in residence halls can be changed online at http://webster.bradley.edu.

Transcript of Credits

A transcript of credits is an authentic copy or printout of the student’s academic record. No partial transcripts will be issued. Transcripts are released only on written request of the individual concerned. This order must be placed in person or by mail to the Registrar’s Office. No phone orders can be accepted. Bradley University has authorized the National Student Clearinghouse to provide transcript ordering at bradley.edu/registrar/transcripts.

A fee of $4.00 for each copy ordered is payable in advance for transcripts. No student who is indebted to the University in any way will be issued a transcript until the debt is cleared by the office concerned.

Bradley University does not issue nor certify copies of transcripts from other institutions.

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Financial Obligation of the Student

No report of grades is sent for the student whose financial account with the University has not been settled in full, nor will the grades be available on the Web. Likewise no diploma, professional certificate, transcript of credit, or other information concerning academic record is given until the student’s account has been cleared.

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Student Consumer Information

Federal regulations require universities to make student consumer information available to prospective and current students concerning: financial assistance information; institutional programs and policies; graduation rates; safety programs, policies, and crime statistics; athletic program participation rates and financial support data; and rights under Family Education Rights and Privacy Act. This information may be obtained by requesting the Student-Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act Compliance Report from Bradley University’s Office of University Relations at (309) 677-3164. Safety information and crime statistics are available online at bradley.edu/police/
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Contact

Academic and Marketing Publications • (309) 677-3391